November 2017 - Upcoming Events

Date Event
Type
Title Campus Building
10/20 - 11/20 Exhibit Crocheted Vessels and Reconstructed Art ~three-dimensional works by Mary Ann Lomonaco NBG Kaplan Hall, Foyer of Mindy Ross Gallery

10/22 - 11/21

Exhibit

Translating the Mind’s Eye: oil paintings by Laura Von Rosk

NBG Kaplan Hall, Mindy Ross Gallery
11/2 - 11/20 Exhibit War in the Arts: Redeeming Spirits MID Orange Hall Gallery

11/3;
6 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Film Art in the Face of War MID Orange Hall Gallery
11/5;
3 pm
Concert

American String Quartet - Lyric in a Time of War

MID The William and Helen Richards Theatre in Orange Hall

11/9;
1 pm

Lecture Temple Grandin: Behavioral Principles and Reducing Stress in Animal Handling MID Room 010, RCSE
11/9;
7 pm
Lecture

Temple Grandin: The Autistic Brain: All Kinds of Minds Can Succeed 

MID Paramount Theater,
17 South Street

11/10:

7 pm

Film Bicycle Theives NBG Kaplan Hall, OBTC Great Room 101
11/13;
6:30 pm
Film Radio Bikini: the Atomic Bomb Testing MID Orange Hall Gallery
11/15;
7 pm
Lecture

Fortress West Point and the Hudson River Valley: General George Washington's "Key of America"

NBG Kaplan Hall, OBTC Great Room 101


TRANSLATING THE MIND’S EYE: PAINTINGS BY LAURA VON ROSK

A solo show in the Mindy Ross Gallery, Translating the Mind’s Eye: paintings by Laura Von Rosk, contrasts palettes created by the artist’s interpretation of extremely different parts of the world -- Antarctica and the Adirondacks along with the Hudson Valley. Von Rosk lives in the Adirondacks in upstate New York and has lived in Antarctica while being part of a scientific research team led by her husband, Sam Bowser, PhD, who grew up in the Town of Wallkill near Middletown.Untitled (tree - 2017) oil by Laura Von Rosk

“By using elements of landscape, mixing natural forms with memory and imagination, the images become ‘constructed’ landscapes. Forms are repeated, emphasized, manipulated, or invented,” she explains. Her paintings may be about a specific place, or a certain experience of a place, or a response to the work of other artists such as European early Renaissance paintings, as well as Persian manuscripts.  “The forms (lakes, ditches, open fields, holes, icebergs, glaciers) are not just a product of what I see, but combine what I know about constructing paintings with some deep and as yet unconscious memory system with what I see in the landscape.”

Von Rosk’s exhibit is scheduled from October 22 to November 21, 2017.Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets (GPS: 73 First St), on the Newburgh campus of SUNY Orange. Regular Gallery hours are 8am to 9pm, Monday through Th ursday and 8am to 6pm, Friday.

Untitled (light on snow trail) oil by Laura Von RoskIn addition to the NYFA fellowship, her awards include an Individual Artist Support Grant from the Pollack-Krasner Foundation; an artist Fellowship Grant from the Bernheim Foundation in Clermont, KY; a Lake Placid Lodge, Adirondack Art Fund Grant; an Arts Council of the Northern Adirondacks, Artist and Community Exchange Grant; as well as several art residencies in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, California, and the State of Washington.

Laura Von Rosk holds a BFA from SUNY Purchase and an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Presently, she is Gallery Director of the Lake George Arts Project. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at   (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu   

NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellowships are administered with leadership support from New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Photos, top to bottom: Untitled (tree - 2017) oil by Laura Von Rosk; Untitled (light on snow trail) oil by Laura Von Rosk.

 

[ to top ]

 


 CROCHETED VESSELS AND RECONSTRUCTED ART ~THREE-DIMENSIONAL WORKS

From October 20 through November 20, 2017, NYFA artist Mary Ann Lomonaco will show her artworks in the glass vitrine cases in the Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery in Kaplan Hall. Crocheted Vessels and Reconstructed Art ~Three-Dimensional Works continues the Artists in Excellence series with pieces of various sizes, colors, and shapes. All of theAltar Piece - metal - by Mary Ann Lomonacoworks are made from recycled or repurposed materials.

“My three-dimensional mixed media constructions are made from recycled, reclaimed, reconstructed “stuff” using a variety of techniques and materials… Transformation for me involves discovering the potential... the endless possibilities...” states Lomonaco.

This exhibit is part of the two-year-long, statewide Innovator and Activist Visual Artists: New York Foundation for the Arts Celebration.

New York Stories - plastic - by Mary Ann LomonacoMary Ann Lomonaco holds a BFA from Parsons School of Design. She was the recipient of An American Experience 2002 - Associated Artists of Winston-Salem, NC, Merit Award and an Images 2010 - Robeson Gallery, Penn State University, PA, 2010, Merit Award as well as the NewYork Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) 2001 Fellowship. She also received a Ragdale Foundation Residency at Lake Forest, Ill., in 2005.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Regular Gallery hours: 8am to 9pm, Monday-Thursday; 8am to 6pm, Friday. Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand & First Streets (GPS: 73 First St), on the Newburgh campus of SUNY Orange. Free, secure parking is available in the parking garage entered at 73 First St. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu 

Photos, top to bottom: Altar Piece - metal - by Mary Ann Lomonaco; New York Stories - plastic - by Mary Ann Lomonaco.

[ to top ]

 


War in the Arts: Redeeming Spirits

 

During the month of November in Orange Hall Gallery, the exhibit on view will be on a timely, yet seemingly constant topic – war. Titled War in the Arts: Redeeming Spirits, the goal is to express what war does to the human spirit, the community, the family, ethnic groups, countries, historically through present day, and then to reflect upon that and relate through one’s artform. This is not intended to be political.Thorns - forged steel, by Bill Graziano

Artists have used paintings, drawings, sculptures, assemblages, collages, photography, embroidery and fabric, animation, video,  and poetry to reflect and relate their personal reactions to war.

Several participants are war veterans themselves including an 87 year old Korean War combat photographer. The reflections are poignant and powerful. Artworks depict in representational, semi-abstract and abstract styles the Civil War, WWs I & II, Korean, Vietnam, Central America, 9/11, the Nigerian Civil War, Israel/Palestine, misplaced migrant workers, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Poems speak the pervasive feelings of fear and horror of combinations of wars; yet often the uplifting human spirit of courage and optimism to move forward. 

This extensive exhibit, curated by Karen Gersch, will be on view from November 2 through 20, 9am to 8pm Monday through Thursday and 9am to 6pm on Friday and during performances in the William and Helen Richards Theatre at Orange Hall.

At the opening reception on Saturday, November 4 from 1 to 3:30pm, pianist Geoff Hamburg will play classical and contemporary music.

Home at Last, Charcoal on paper, by Kelly SeizAlso, on Friday, November 3 at 6pm the film Art in the Face of War will be screened in the gallery. The exhibit, reception, and film screening are free and open to the public.

In addition, on Sunday, November 5 at 3pm, the American String Quartet will present Lyric in a Time of War with author Phil Klay and poet Tom Sleigh reading selections from their written works. This performance carries an admission. However, students, veterans and active military are admitted free.

Orange Hall is located on the campus of SUNY Orange at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown. (GPS: 24 Grandview Ave.) Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Photos, top to bottom: Thorns, forged steel, by Bill Graziano; Home at Last, Charcoal on paper, by Kelly Seiz

 

[ to top ]


 

Art in the Face of WarArt in the Face of War Film graphic

Film director David E. Baugnon will introduce Art in the Face of War, an award-winning documentary, on Friday, November 3, 2017 starting at 6pm. The screening, which is free and open to the public, will take place in Orange Hall Gallery amidst the large exhibit War in the Arts: Redeeming Spirits.

Baugnon’s comprehensive talk will explain the concept and organizing of the film and will include time for Q & A.

The film recounts the service of eight World War II artist/veterans through their riveting stories told in late-life interviews that have been described in a review excerpt from The Stamford  [CT] Times as giving “clear-eyed details, [such that] they could be recalling the events from last week." The stories as shown through their art, chronicle WWII from the perspective of these young soldiers who, as visual artists, used their respective medium -- paint, pencil, charcoal, or camera – in journalism as a tactical tool, and as a means of preserving their own sanity as they confronted the inhumanities of war.

Orange Hall is located on the campus of SUNY Orange at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown. (GPS: 24 Grandview Ave.) Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.  

[ to top ]

 

 


 

American String Quartet - Lyric in a Time of War

Music expresses what words cannot, but in addressing the issues of war and healing the American String Quartet (ASQ) has combined the powers of both by having two award-winning writers take significant roles in the performance. Lyric in a Time of War is a full-length classical concert during which author Phil Klay will read from his award-winning book Redeployment and multi-honored poet Tom Sleigh will read from his books of poems, Station Zed and  Army Cats. Together music and the written/spoken word will provide a wonderfully rich and thought-provoking concert on Sunday, November 5, 2017 at 3 pm.Members of American String Quartet with Phil Klay (second from left) and Tom Sleigh (third from left).

The venue for this certain-to-be-memorable event is the William and Helen Richards Theatre at Orange Hall, newly renamed for the late president of SUNY Orange and his widow who enjoyed concerts in Orange Hall including those by ASQ.

Selections from the works of composers Bach, Beethoven, Bartók, Barber, and Shostakovich give a broad view of the classical repertoire played by this internationally acclaimed quartet who engage an audience through each player’s virtuosic skills and warm personalities.

The American String Quartet is the string quartet in residence at the Manhattan School of Music and the Aspen Music Festival and continues its educational offerings at many residencies throughout the year. Phil Klay won the National Book Award for fiction in 2014 for his first book-length publication, Redeployment , a collection of short stories.  He was Princeton’s Hodder Fellow for the 2015-2016 academic year and was a public affairs officer in the US Marines. Tom Sleigh is a Distinguished Professor at Hunter College and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and Africa. In addition to winning an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, he has also received the Poetry Society of America's Shelley Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts awards.

Following the concert, a book signing by the two writers will take play in Orange Hall Gallery.

Tickets are available online anytime and at the box office starting at 2 pm before the performance.

Admission is $15 for adults; $10 for senior citizens, faculty, staff, and alumni; for all students are admitted free but must pick up a ticket at the box office. Veterans and active military are admitted free.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues (GPS: 24 Grandview Avenue), Middletown, NY. Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-4891.

Photo: Members of American String Quartet with Phil Klay (second from left) and Tom Sleigh (third from left). Photo by J. Mae Barizo.

 

[ to top ]


 

Temple Grandin speaks on Behavioral Principles and Reducing Stress in Animal HANDLING

Temple Grandin by Rosalie WinardPeople worldwide associate Dr. Temple Grandin as an icon for living and working with autism. However, in addition to speaking about the autistic brain and how different kinds of minds can be successful, she is an expert in animal behavior and handling. In fact, her MS and PhD are in Animal Science from Arizona State University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively. Indeed, she teaches “Livestock Behavior and Facility Design” at Colorado State University where she is a professor. She also is a consultant and designer of livestock handling facilities and owns Grandin Livestock Handling Systems Inc.

On Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 1pm, she will deliver her lecture, Behavioral Principles and Reducing Stress in Animal Handling at the Rowley Center for Science & Engineering in the Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, Room 010. This lecture is free & open to the public with no registration. A book signing will take place immediately following Q & A.

Grandin has authored several books on the subject:

  • Humane Livestock Handling: Understanding livestock behavior and building facilities for healthier animals
  • Guide to Working with Farm Animals: Safe, Humane Livestock Handling Practices for the Small Farm
  • Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals
  • Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior

The Rowley Center for Science and Engineering is located at 10 East Conkling Avenue on the Middletown campus of SUNY Orange. Free parking can be found on street and in the college parking garage which is directly across the street from RCSE.

This presentation is made in collaboration with Cornell Cooperative Extension: Equine/Livestock Division.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at  (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

 

photo: Temple Grandin by Rosalie Winard

 

[ to top ]


 

The Autistic Brain: All Kinds of Minds Can Succeed - [SOLD OUT]

World renowned autism icon, Dr. Temple Grandin, will lecture on living and working with autism on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 7pm. The venue for this auspicious occasion and important presentation is the Historic Paramount Theater. Located in downtown Middletown at 17 South Street, it is a walk away from three municipal lots and on-street parking as well.

Her speaking engagement on November 9th at the Paramount Theater is SOLD OUT!

Temple Grandin, PhD

Entitled The Autistic Brain: All Kinds of Minds Can Succeed, the lecture with PowerPoint, shows scientific images and data, and visually conveys what an autistic brain processes. In addition, Dr. Grandin explains how it works and assures attendees that different kinds of brains can be successful.

Temple Grandin holds a BA in Psychology from Franklin Pierce College and an MS and PhD in Animal Science from Arizona State University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively. She teaches “Livestock Behavior and Facility Design” at Colorado State University where she is a professor. She also is a consultant and designer of livestock handling facilities and owns Grandin Livestock Handling Systems Inc. From 1984 to the present, Temple Grandin has been honored with 83 awards and honorary doctorates. She is the author of seventeen books.

This event is arranged by Cultural Affairs: cultural@sunyorange.edu and 845-341-4891.

photo: Temple Grandin by Rosalie Winard

 

[ to top ]


Bicycle Thieves the classic Italian film with introduction and Q&A by Dr. Jean Carlos Cowan

On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 7:00pm, come to the OBTC Great Room 101 in Kaplan Hall at SUNY Orange for the screening of Bicycle Thieves, the award-winning and Oscar nominated classic Italian film. This program is free and open to the public and is intended for students as well as the general public

Bicycle Theives - still from movie“Hailed around the world as one of the greatest movies ever made, Bicycle Thieves,directed by Vittorio De Sica, defined an era in cinema. In poverty-stricken postwar Rome, a man is on his first day of a new job that offers hope of salvation for his desperate family when his bicycle, which he needs for work, is stolen. With his young son in tow, he sets off to track down the thief. Simple in construction and profoundly rich in human insight,Bicycle Thievesembodies the greatest strengths of the Italian neorealist movement: emotional clarity, social rectitude, and brutal honesty.”  (Criterion Film Collection)

Presented as originally created in black and white, the film is 89 minutes in length in Italian with English subtitles.  Jean Carlos Cowan, PhD, a SUNY Orange Global Studies professor, will introduce the film, giving it some historical and artistic perspective for a modern audience.      Dr. Cowan will also lead a post-screening discussion with Q & A.

Released in 1948, and first shown in the United States in 1949, Ladri di biciclette (sometimes known in the United States as The Bicycle Thief), received numerous awards, including:

  • Honorary Academy Award (1950): voted by the Academy Board of Governors as the most outstanding foreign language film released in the United States during 1949.
  • Academy Award Nomination (1950): Best Screenplay, Cesare Zavattini
  • BAFTA Film Award (British Academy of Film and Television Arts) (1950): Best Film from any Source
  • Golden Globes Award (1950): Best Foreign Film
  • Listed as one of TCM's top 15 most influential films.

The film stars Lamberto Maggiorani, Enzo Staiola, and Lianella Carell, among others; with cinematography by Carlo Montuori, and original music by Alessandro Cicognini.

For more information, send an email to cultural@sunyorange.edu or call (845) 341-9386. Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh.  Free and secure parking is available in the Kaplan Hall garage accessible at 73 First Street.

 

[ to top ]

 


 

Fortress West Point and the Hudson River Valley: General George Washington’s “Key of America.”

The Hudson River Valley is a region of phenomenal natural beauty. It is a painters and photographer’s

paradise with each season bringing a different set of colors and indigenous flora and fauna to appreciate and record. From small town to the metropolis of New York City, it abounds in cultural opportunities. Historically, it has been recognized as a strategic region. That was certainly true during the time of the American Revolution.

Col. James M. Johnson, PhD

On Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 7pm, James M. Johnson, PhD will speak in the OBTC Great Room 101 in Kaplan Hall on one of the strategic points along the Hudson River in his lecture, Fortress West Point and the Hudson River Valley: General George Washington’s “Key of America.” The presentation should be enlightening to scholars as well as students and the general public as the speaker is, indeed, an expert in his field being designated at the Military Historian of the Hudson Valley and Executive Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute at Marist College which is the academic arm of the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area.

Johnson is a retired colonel in U. S. Army, a graduate of the United States Military Academy where he taught for many years, and presently is the Dr. Frank T. Bumpus Chair in Hudson River Valley History and Associate Professor of History at Marist College. He has been honored with a dozen awards on American History and historic preservation from various historical organizations. He has authored numerous books and articles, and has enjoyed being a Revolutionary War Militia reenactor. In addition to his BS from USMA, he holds an MA and a PhD from Duke University and also an MA in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.  

Come learn about the rich history of this region --the Hudson Valley—from a very engaging lecturer during this presentation which is free and open to the public.

Kaplan Hall at SUNY Orange is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, NY. Free, secure parking is available in the parking garage via the 73 First Street entrance.

For more information, contact Cultural Affairs at cultural@sunyorange.edu or call (845) 341-4891.

[ to top ]

 


 

Radio Bikini: the Atomic Bomb Testing

Ten and a half months after the second atomic bomb was detonated over Japan with the target for that drop being Nagasaki, the United States Government conducted testing of nuclear devices to investigate the effect of nuclear weapons on warships. The area chosen for the pair of nuclear weapon tests was Bikini Atoll which included Bikini, Eneu, Nam, and Enidrik islands plus the Lagoon which the islands and Reef almost entirely surrounded.Gene Weinstein

An Academy Award nominated documentary was made of this venture, termed "the world's first nuclear disaster" by chemist Glenn T. Seaborg, the longest-serving chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. A screening of this film Radio Bikini, is scheduled for Monday,   November 13, 2017 at 6:30pm in Orange Hall Gallery, SUNY Orange. Rare and archival footage combines ‘live’ radio broadcasts from Bikini Island in 1946 with footage of the entire operation. Radio Bikini won first place awards at the San Francisco Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival.

Gene Weinstein, known in this area for his teaching biology at Monticello High School for forty years and being a 22-year volunteer bald eagle monitor of the NYS Bald Eagle Restoration Project, was a radioman second class in the US Navy in the Pacific during this time. He will give annotative commentary in addition to the film. Following the screening, he will discuss the circumstances through Q & A. This event, Radio Bikini: the Atomic Bomb Testing, is free and open to the public.

Operation Crossroads, as it was code-named, took place in two bomb drops on June 30 and July 24, 1946. The native population of Bikini Island, numbering 167, who were evacuated because of the heavy radiation that would occur from the bombing, was never able to return. That changed these indigenous people’s way of living and some of them died. Test animals that were deliberately confined and penned on decks of the ships in Operation Crossroads died of radiation exposure within two days.

Ninety-five ships of various types were placed in the lagoon as targets. No decontamination procedures had been tested in advance, and in the absence of a protocol, the ships were cleaned using traditional deck-scrubbing methods: hoses, mops, and brushes, with water, soap, and lye. Secondary contamination occurred in a major degree when the clean-up of the area and the ships by unprotected sailors stirred up radioactive material which contaminated their skin, clothing, and, presumably, their lungs, and additionally upon returning to their support ship living quarters, they thereby further contaminated the shower stalls, laundry facilities, and everything they touched.

Orange Hall is situated at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown. (GPS: 24 Grandview Ave.) Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.  

 

[ to top ]


 

 

 

menu_temp


Contact Us:
Dorothy Szefc
Coordinator of Cultural Affairs
(845) 341-4891
cultural@sunyorange.edu

All Cultural Affairs Events are open to the public and all buildings are universally accessible.

NOTE: All artists' images on these pages are copyrighted and are used by kind permission of the artists. Please do not download, reproduce or use without permission.